3 Niche REITs Paying Big Dividends

Posted by D4L | Wednesday, July 29, 2015 | | 0 comments »

Real estate investment trusts (REITs) continue to attract investors looking for big dividends and income in today’s low interest rate environment. Designed to allow regular retail investors the ability to invest in commercial properties, REITs are required to pay out the vast bulk of their cash flows as dividends. That payout requirement produces yields in the 4% to 7% range for the majority of the sector.

And unlike many high-yielding sectors, REITs actually perform quite well in rising rate environments after the initial “shock” of the rate hike. That makes them perfect additions for anyone’s portfolio these days. Here are 3 niche REITs paying out big dividends: Digital Realty Trust (DLR), EPR Properties (EPR) and Extra Space Storage (EXR).

Source: InvestorPlace

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This year's Japan Dividend Stream-measured in the local currency, the yen-set a new record of ¥9.03 trillion.1 This number is almost double what the Dividend Stream was at its bottom in 2010. The growth in dividends reflects the increased profits of corporate Japan, as well as companies' better balance sheet management.

Over the last three years (since the 2012 Index screening), Japan dividends are up 56% when measured in yen, but they are down 1.6% when measured in U.S. dollars. This change in the exchange rate over the last three years shows how much currency can detract from the experience of local markets. In fact, in U.S. dollar terms, the 2015 dividends were lower than the 2014 dividends and even lower than the 2012 dividends, before Prime Minister Abe was elected at the end of 2012 and ushered in new economic initiatives aimed at restoring growth in Japan.

Source: Seeking Alpha

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7 Stocks to Fund a Happy Retirement

Posted by D4L | Tuesday, July 28, 2015 | | 0 comments »

I spend a lot time thinking about my investments. It sort of comes with the job description. But when I eventually retire, I don’t intend to spend my days with my eyes glued to a monitor. I want to retire with my mind at ease and with a steady stream of cash coming in. So, what are some of the qualities I would look for in an ideal retirement stock? To start, it absolutely must pay a respectable dividend. I buy plenty of stocks that do not pay dividends, and there is nothing wrong with that.

Young, fast-growing companies generally have more pressing needs for their cash. But any stock I would feel comfortable holding in retirement needs to be mature enough to pay a dividend — potentially for decades. And finally, the stock should have survived a good crisis or two without cutting its dividend. If you’re planning on living off dividends, you need to have faith that they’re going to be there for you when you need them. So with no more ado, let’s jump into my list of seven stocks to fund a happy retirement: Realty Income (O), Ventas, Inc. (VTR), McDonald’s (MCD), StoneMor Partners (STON), Kinder Morgan Inc (KMI), Enterprise Products Partners (EPD) and ExxonMobil (XOM).

Source: InvestorPlace

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Investors are growing increasingly worried about the Greek debt crisis and its possible implications across different markets. It's hard to tell what might happen next in this dramatically complex situation, let alone trying to forecast how the economic problems in Europe could impact other financial markets around the world. The cold, hard truth is that recessions and bear markets happen. They are hard to predict, and they can occur for a number of reasons, including economic factors, shifting investor sentiment, or many other unpredictable variables.

The bad news is that you can't forecast bear markets with any precision, but the good news is that you don´t need a crystal ball to make sound investment decisions over the long term. Rock-solid dividend powerhouses such as PepsiCo (NYSE:PEP), Wal-Mart (NYSE:WMT), and Colgate-Palmolive (NYSE:CL) have the strength to endure all kinds of economic and financial uncertainties and continue delivering growing cash payments to investors over the long term.

Source: Motley Fool

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I have given this article the same title as that of a recent article on Morningstar. The subtitle to Morningstar's article was, "Worry less about beating the benchmark and more about dividend growth and achieving your desired outcomes, says Morningstar's Josh Peters." I agree with that statement completely, and it was what enticed me to read the whole transcript. I would like to go through some of that article and show where I agree and disagree with Peters' remarks. All indented quotes in this article are Peters' words from the interview.

"Benchmarks are important. To be able to compare your returns over a long period of time against, say, the S&P 500 is not a bad idea because that's sort of a default option that you can get with very low cost. If, over a very long period of time, you're taking just as much risk as--or more than--the S&P 500 and not getting as much return, then maybe you should just index. So, for active managers everywhere who are sort of under siege, that is what you have to do. You have to add some value either with less risk or more return or preferably both." I do not place much weight on measuring the total return of my dividend growth investing against benchmarks, because total return is not my goal. Instead, my goal is to produce a sufficient, reliable, rising stream of income. The endgame is to be able to live off that income in retirement.

Source: Seeking Alpha

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